Cactus hybrids

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Sarraceniacrazy
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Cactus hybrids

Post by Sarraceniacrazy »

Just curious if there's a list of cacti species that can be hybridized. For instance, can you cross an echinocereus with a mammillaria? Any help is greatly appreciated.
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Aiko
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by Aiko »

I can only recall Leuchtenbergia with Ferocactus, known as Ferobergia.
And maybe you can add chimearas to this, which is a result of (among other?) grafting.
Sarraceniacrazy
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by Sarraceniacrazy »

Aiko wrote: Sun Sep 29, 2019 10:48 pm I can only recall Leuchtenbergia with Ferocactus, known as Ferobergia.
And maybe you can add chimearas to this, which is a result of (among other?) grafting.
Thank you Aiko!
esp_imaging
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by esp_imaging »

Many cacti will hybridise freely, even with different genera, although many won't. Some hybrids may be possible, but will occur rarely or with a poor chance of success.

A naturally occurring hybrid between different genera is Pacherocactus orcuttii, a cross between Pachycereus pringlei and Bergerocactus emoryi.
In general, crosses are more likely the more closely species are related to each other. For example, many hybrids have been produced amongst the related species of Echinopsis / Lobivia / Trichocereus, but you would almost certainly struggle to cross an Ariocarpus with a Pereskia, an Austroactus with Carnegia or Mammillaria with Rebutia.

Cladograms or Phylogenetic trees give some clues about species which may be close enough to hybridise - there's plenty of scope for experimentation.
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Sarraceniacrazy
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by Sarraceniacrazy »

esp_imaging wrote: Mon Sep 30, 2019 1:09 am Many cacti will hybridise freely, even with different genera, although many won't. Some hybrids may be possible, but will occur rarely or with a poor chance of success.

A naturally occurring hybrid between different genera is Pacherocactus orcuttii, a cross between Pachycereus pringlei and Bergerocactus emoryi.
In general, crosses are more likely the more closely species are related to each other. For example, many hybrids have been produced amongst the related species of Echinopsis / Lobivia / Trichocereus, but you would almost certainly struggle to cross an Ariocarpus with a Pereskia, an Austroactus with Carnegia or Mammillaria with Rebutia.

Cladograms or Phylogenetic trees give some clues about species which may be close enough to hybridise - there's plenty of scope for experimentation.
Thank you esp! Are there any lists of known species that can be hybridized?
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Re: Cactus hybrids

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Shane
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by Shane »

I wondered the same thing and have been following this since you posted it. Today I found a pretty good phylogenetic tree of Cactaceae:
https://bsapubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com ... jb.1000129
They didn't attempt to make a tree for the entire family, but the most comprehensive is on page 52. Doesn't say what will hybridize, but allows for us to make educated guesses
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Aloinopsis
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by Aloinopsis »

Shane wrote: Thu Apr 16, 2020 11:07 pm I wondered the same thing and have been following this since you posted it. Today I found a pretty good phylogenetic tree of Cactaceae:
https://bsapubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com ... jb.1000129
They didn't attempt to make a tree for the entire family, but the most comprehensive is on page 52. Doesn't say what will hybridize, but allows for us to make educated guesses
It does not surprise me that Aztekium, Geohintonia, and Astrophytum are so close to one another. I find them very similar in care needs as well.
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mmcavall
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by mmcavall »

Concerning Mammillaria only, do they hybridize (between species)?
I have several Mammillarias in bloom now, and many native bees are visiting them.
I would like to harvest "pure" seeds, definitely I dont want hybrids. As I don't see too many hybrids in the genus, I'm assuming they will (mostly) fail to hybridize, but I'm not sure.
Perhaps I should be concerned only with species within the same Series (Within Ancistracanthae, for example). Am I close to the right answer?
Thanks in advance for any input.
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MikeInOz
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by MikeInOz »

mmcavall wrote: Thu Jun 17, 2021 8:55 pm Concerning Mammillaria only, do they hybridize (between species)?
I have several Mammillarias in bloom now, and many native bees are visiting them.
I would like to harvest "pure" seeds, definitely I dont want hybrids. As I don't see too many hybrids in the genus, I'm assuming they will (mostly) fail to hybridize, but I'm not sure.
Perhaps I should be concerned only with species within the same Series (Within Ancistracanthae, for example). Am I close to the right answer?
Thanks in advance for any input.
I am quite certain the red spined Mamm carmenae is a hybrid. Possibly with subducta?? Spines a quite stiff. Still very beautiful and worth growing..

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Shane
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by Shane »

mmcavall wrote: Thu Jun 17, 2021 8:55 pm Concerning Mammillaria only, do they hybridize (between species)?
I have several Mammillarias in bloom now, and many native bees are visiting them.
I would like to harvest "pure" seeds, definitely I dont want hybrids. As I don't see too many hybrids in the genus, I'm assuming they will (mostly) fail to hybridize, but I'm not sure.
Perhaps I should be concerned only with species within the same Series (Within Ancistracanthae, for example). Am I close to the right answer?
Thanks in advance for any input.
Mammillaria generally don't readily hybridize with each other. There aren't really many (any?) well documented Mammillaria hybrids out there, which to me is a sign of this. They very easily self pollinate and apparently prefer that to interspecific outcrossing. I think it's a safe bet they will mostly fail to hybridize

It's also important to note here that research is showing Mammillaria is likely not a single genus but several similar looking genera. So a "Mammillaria" isn't necessarily closely related to another "Mammillaria" which would be another barrier to hybridization
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Carbo
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by Carbo »

I crossed echinocereus poselgeri with the common peanut cactus (echinopsis chamaecereus) and there are fruits with seeds. Echinocereus was used as a mother plant and it's making fruits.
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7george
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by 7george »

Carbo wrote: Wed Jun 23, 2021 7:00 pm I crossed echinocereus poselgeri with the common peanut cactus (echinopsis chamaecereus) and there are fruits with seeds. Echinocereus was used as a mother plant and it's making fruits.
In this case Echinopsis pollen might just been used for stimulation of Echinocereus to self-pollinate. If you grow seedling from those seeds will be clear are these hybrids or pure Echinocereus poselgeri offspring.
If your cacti mess in your job just forget about the job.
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Carbo
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by Carbo »

7george wrote: Sat Jun 26, 2021 1:56 am In this case Echinopsis pollen might just been used for stimulation of Echinocereus to self-pollinate. If you grow seedling from those seeds will be clear are these hybrids or pure Echinocereus poselgeri offspring.
Interesting, I'm actually looking into ways to self-pollinate self-incompatible species, do share if you know of any other ways.
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Re: Cactus hybrids

Post by 7george »

Carbo wrote: Sat Jun 26, 2021 11:15 am
7george wrote: Sat Jun 26, 2021 1:56 am In this case Echinopsis pollen might just been used for stimulation of Echinocereus to self-pollinate. If you grow seedlings from those seeds will be clear are these hybrids or pure Echinocereus poselgeri offspring.
Interesting, I'm actually looking into ways to self-pollinate self-incompatible species, do share if you know of any other ways.
Sure. You can try using some nectar (diluted honey) over the stigma of the flower and then apply some pollen from the same plant. Sometimes it works even with fewer seeds crop.
If your cacti mess in your job just forget about the job.
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