Succulents on the Niagara Frontier

This is a place for members to post on-going topics about their plants and experiences.
Tony
Posts: 10770
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2005 2:56 am
Location: Chino, Ca, USA (zone 10)
Contact:

Post by Tony »

Great looking cacti and euphorbia collection you have there. 8)
Forget the dog...Beware of the plants!!!

Tony
User avatar
Tetrazole
Posts: 417
Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 8:44 pm
Location: Western New York State

Post by Tetrazole »

R-,

I was able to get both an Acanthocalycium minitum and an Acanthocalycium glaucum late last year or early this year. The A. glaucum died a horrible rapid rotting death about a month and a half ago. The A. minitum made up for it though. I don't know if I will replace the A. glaucum or not. What I want is a nice sized A. violaceum.

Can't agree more about the Mammillarias. Except for the few really spectacular ones like M. theresae, M. Luethyi and perhaps M. Senilis, I can't get too excited about them. For the most part they have dinky little flowers and way too many species. (Odd, this thread won't let me use the word d i n k y. why do you suppose that is?)

It was your directing me to a discussion regarding the true identity of variegated Euphorbia mammillaris in an earlier thread that got the proper ID on the E. fimbriata variegata. I now have two of them - one a save from the floor at a local Lowe's (broken segement) and the new one. The saved segment is about ready to be put into its own small pot. It is now making its first set of new branches.

The E. persistentifolia never did make any leaves to really speak of. After we started having consistent hot weather they took off like rockets. They now how increased in size by 1/3 easily and a couple even made some side arms. Trying to get cuttings of these to take late in the fall or winter was a complete waste of time. They just rotted off at the soil line.

The E. aeruginosa seems to grow like gangbusters so far. I would like to get it into a pot of its own as well. If I recall, it bloomed once for me - about a month after receiving it in the fall. Perhaps it does all of it's growing this time of year and blooms in the fall.

The E. leucodendron may just not like the level of light it is getting (full sun for 2/3rds + of the day). I wrote to the person that I got the start from and they confirmed that it was not a bloom and die type of plant. She said that in its natural environment they get quite large but they liked some shade when they were small. It has been receiving regular watering but the stems are pasty in color and getting wrinkly. It will be moved to a place with more shade to see if this improves it any.

Thanks for your compliments on the A. minitum and thoughts on the Euphorbias.

Regards,
Nathan
“Whenever people say, 'We mustn't be sentimental,' you can take it they are about to do something cruel. And if they add, 'We must be realistic,' they mean they are going to make money out of it.”
― Brigid Brophy
User avatar
Tetrazole
Posts: 417
Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 8:44 pm
Location: Western New York State

Night Bloomers! Bah Humbug!

Post by Tetrazole »

Ever buy a hybrid, pay more than you wanted to, saw lots seller photos of the plant in spectacular bloom, and just assumed it was blooming during the day. After all, if you only saw that ephemeral blossom after midnight it would be somewhat of a deal breaker. Who wants to have to wake back up to see if it opened in the wee hours of the morning and who will get up with you to share the enjoyment of the flower?????!!!! :evil: :evil:


I give you the Echinopsis Hybrid known as Lady Evelyn at 12 stinkin' thirty in the morning!
Image

The lady from another angle.
Image

A third photo of our lady of the evening.
Image

Photo taken after sunrise. Perhaps she will last a day. Part of the annoyance was having experienced several hybrids that not only bloom at night but close shortly after sunrise - you would think they crossed some of these with E. mirabila!
Image

Now this one, Pseudolobivia kratochviliana, being a species plant, doesn't bother me in the least that it opens at night. We both knew the ground rules when I procured her - no subterfuge. She will be ready for her closeup later in the wee hours or tomorrow night.
Image

As predicted, she bloomed very early this morning - around 3:00. These usually last until mid to late afternoon of the day they opened.
Image
“Whenever people say, 'We mustn't be sentimental,' you can take it they are about to do something cruel. And if they add, 'We must be realistic,' they mean they are going to make money out of it.”
― Brigid Brophy
User avatar
john b
Posts: 944
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2008 5:54 pm
Location: monterey, california

Post by john b »

Some real beauties in your collection! Love the lobivias.

John B
User avatar
Tetrazole
Posts: 417
Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 8:44 pm
Location: Western New York State

Post by Tetrazole »

It seems fewer plants are now in bloom. Mostly the Rebutias have quieted down for the season. It seemed that there were at least 5 or more of them blooming daily for a while.

The heat finally put a few of the plants in the mood for taking root. The three Alluaudia cuttings planted back in mid-April were pulled from their pot to see if they had rooted - and they had! Now they are planted in more soil than top dressing and some new leaves are forming.

Image


My Pachycereus pringlei has put on some serious new growth in the past week. I like the color mix of the new spines and flesh forming.

Image
Image

An order of four new plants came in this week from Miles 2 Go. They had two new species of Hoodia and a couple of Pachypodia that I wanted. The plants were very clean and excellent specimens - thanks Miles!

H. juttae
Image

H. rauschii (ruschii) The first species spelling is from the M2G site and the second is the spelling seen elsewhere.
Image

Pachypodium namaquanum
Image

Pachypodium saundersii compacta This one was about twice the size I expected.
Image

Two of my succulent Senecio plants are in bloom. The blooms are very similar in size and color. They have that slightly spicy aster odor - a little like fall mums. I believe more flies than bees visit them overall.

Senecio mweroensis ssp saginatus
Image

Senecio pendulus
Image

The foliage color on the Senecio below is really appealing. The full sunlight kissed a few of the leaf tips with a little purple hue.

Senecio vitalis
Image


The bloom on this Copiapoa barquitensis opened up three days in a row.
Image

I believe this is only the second time in as many years that this Copiapoa tenuissima has bloomed. I like the dark body color of this and the previous plant - the shell in the foreground really matches the plants well.
Image

I had two of these Astrophytum myriostigma plants last year. After one of them bloomed (much later in the season than this) it rotted into a gelatinous mess practically overnight. This was the survivor.
Image

This will be the third set of blooms this year for the Lobivia winteriana below.
Image

Matucana aureiflora The solitary green bee contrast nicely with the brilliant yellow. I have several dozen of these little bees living in a chunk of a maple tree trunk. They drill little hole all through it.
Image

This Gymnocalycium was purchased without a name but I believe it is G. marsoneri. The flowers do not open up very wide but they are quite large.
Image

Another Gymnocalycium purchased without a name. I believe this one to be Gymnocalycium horstii. This plant is over 10 years old - probably closer to 15.
Image

Does anyone want to take a guess as to what species this Gymnocalycium is? Hob did! It's Gymnocalycium mihanovichii subsp. friedrichii. Thanks. It was a Home Depot purchase early this spring. The body color is really fantastic and the blooms last several days in a row.
Image

This and another Gymnocalycium baldianum have been blooming steadily since late Spring. Every day the color is a little different.
Image

Anacamperos rufescens - this plant has moved around the country quite a bit. It is over 23 years old now and has really only really thrived over the past two years.
Image

It took the Echinocereus fendleri flower below over a year to go from little fuzzy spot to an open bloom!!!!! Yes, it had the very beginning of this bloom in April 2009 - what took it so damnably long to develop is beyond me. Yes, it's a beautiful, large flower, but I don't know if it was worth that long of a wait. Perhaps now that it knows how to do it, it will move a little faster from now on.
Image


This was a purchase over e-bay last year from Bodumbilly in Houston, TX. He comes up with some really unusual Euphorbias - often the rarely seen ones that go for higher dollars. The first summer I kinda protected it from direct sun and it didn't put any new peduncles. This year it went into full sunlight and has flowered for 2 months plus now. It is an impressive bit of Mother Nature's way of saying "DON'T TOUCH".
Image
Image


Lastly, our solar powered cat, Brisbane. All of our cats have been named for Australian cities for as long as I can remember - Sydney, Hobart, Darwin . . .Image
Last edited by Tetrazole on Tue Aug 10, 2010 2:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
“Whenever people say, 'We mustn't be sentimental,' you can take it they are about to do something cruel. And if they add, 'We must be realistic,' they mean they are going to make money out of it.”
― Brigid Brophy
User avatar
Arjen
Posts: 4205
Joined: Sun May 17, 2009 7:12 pm
Location: vught, the netherlands
Contact:

Post by Arjen »

great looking flowers!
With apologies to the late Professor C. D. Darlington the following misquotation springs to
mind ‘cactus taxonomy is the pursuit of the impossible by the incompetent’ - Fearn & Pearcy, Rebutia (1981)
User avatar
hob
Posts: 4425
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2006 8:22 pm
Location: sfk england z 8

Post by hob »

Does anyone want to take a guess as to what species this Gymnocalycium is?
Gymnocalycium mihanovichii subsp. friedrichii
incurable cactoholic
growing rebutia's with a mix of others.
User avatar
Tetrazole
Posts: 417
Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 8:44 pm
Location: Western New York State

Post by Tetrazole »

Thanks for the compliments on the collection folks.

Hob, Thank you for the ID on the Gymnocalycium mihanovichii ssp friedrichii. I have relabeled the photos in my files, updated the excel spreadsheet and made a new label spike for the pot. It's easily one of the best looking gymno's I have.

Regards
Nathan
“Whenever people say, 'We mustn't be sentimental,' you can take it they are about to do something cruel. And if they add, 'We must be realistic,' they mean they are going to make money out of it.”
― Brigid Brophy
daiv
Site Admin
Posts: 23627
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Long Prairie, MN
Contact:

Post by daiv »

Very nice plants! I like the green bee in the flower especially.
All Cacti are succulents, but not all succulents are Cacti
User avatar
Tetrazole
Posts: 417
Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 8:44 pm
Location: Western New York State

Post by Tetrazole »

A few more in bloom this week.

Astrophytum capricorne and A. capricorne senile
Image

Astrophytum capricorne and A. capricorne senile
Image

Copiapoa hypogaea
Image

Copiapoa marginata - a first bloom for this one!
Image

Copiapoa tenuissima
Image

Echinopsis AHC getting ready to go nuts.
Image

Stapelia scitula - first bloom this year.
Image

Sun moss 1
Image

Sun moss 2
Image

Sun moss 3
Image

Weingartia lanata
Image

Weingartia sp158
Image

Wingartia trollii
Image

Weingartia trollii
Image

W. Trollii and lanata
Image
“Whenever people say, 'We mustn't be sentimental,' you can take it they are about to do something cruel. And if they add, 'We must be realistic,' they mean they are going to make money out of it.”
― Brigid Brophy
User avatar
Tetrazole
Posts: 417
Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 8:44 pm
Location: Western New York State

Collection activity mid to late August 2010

Post by Tetrazole »

Some are reblooming, some for the first time and some are still working on buds. The days are now in the 70's rather than the mid to upper 80's and night time temperatures have dropped as low as the mid 40's but are mostly in the upper 50's to mid 60's. Hopefully we won't tumble into an early cold wet fall.

2nd Blooming of the Acanthocalycium minitum plant. This flower lasted 2 days.
Image

Gymnocalycium pflanzii v. marquezii
Image

Huernia schneideriana
Image

Kalanchoe luciae. This plant bloomed last winter and now there is lots of new growth out of the stalk of that plant. I went ahead and took off all the yellowing leaves from the original growth.
Image

Kalanchoe panamensis
Image

Lobivia prestanoa - at least I think so - the plant was purchased as a Lobivia species with lost name tag.
Image

Lobivia winteriana flower fixin' to open up.
Image

Lobivia winteriana
Image

Monadenium ritchiei blooming.
Image

Pseudolobivia kratochviliana
Image

Senecio confusus - not really one of the succulent senecio species but nice nonetheless.
Image

Senecio pendulus flower cluster.
Image

Senecio tropaeolifolius starting to make buds.
Image

Stapelia flavo-purpurea 1st year blooming.
Image

Stapelia scitula 2nd year blooming.
Image
Last edited by Tetrazole on Fri Aug 27, 2010 4:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.
“Whenever people say, 'We mustn't be sentimental,' you can take it they are about to do something cruel. And if they add, 'We must be realistic,' they mean they are going to make money out of it.”
― Brigid Brophy
daiv
Site Admin
Posts: 23627
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2004 10:15 pm
Location: Long Prairie, MN
Contact:

Post by daiv »

Nice plants! I somehow missed the earlier post about waking up in the night to see the flower. On the plus side, digital cameras sure ease the pain. Imagine the old days when you really would be the only one to see it or you'd only have one little print to show a few friends. Instead well all get to see this:

Image


:thumbleft:
All Cacti are succulents, but not all succulents are Cacti
User avatar
Tetrazole
Posts: 417
Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 8:44 pm
Location: Western New York State

Post by Tetrazole »

Some of the Euphorbias that showed no real growth this summer have just now started pushing new stems through the topping gravel. Hopefully they will get up a few centimeters before I have to take them all in for the year.

E. anoplia
Image

E. baioensis
Image

E. greenwayi
Image

E. scitula
Image

E. cereiformis
Image

E. species nova
Image

E. species nova
Image
“Whenever people say, 'We mustn't be sentimental,' you can take it they are about to do something cruel. And if they add, 'We must be realistic,' they mean they are going to make money out of it.”
― Brigid Brophy
User avatar
Tetrazole
Posts: 417
Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2009 8:44 pm
Location: Western New York State

Post by Tetrazole »

In bloom the first week of September 2010. We went from high 80's/low 90's to low 60's literally overnight. Many plants were just now starting to pup and put out serious growth. Hopefully we will get another few weeks of medium-warm weather to keep the plants from aborting their pups and blooms.

Echinopsis AHC primary plant w/14 buds
Image

E. AHC in bloom
Image

E. subdenudata in bloom
Image

Euphorbia horrida v noorsveldensis cyathia
Image

Lady Evelyn buds
Image

Lady Evelyn in bloom
Image

Leuchtenbergia principis bud
Image

Leuchtenbergia principis bud
Image

Leuchtenbergia principis bloom
Image

1st flowers buds on Lobivia incaica
Image

First blooms on Lobivia incaica
Image

Lobivia winteriana
Image
“Whenever people say, 'We mustn't be sentimental,' you can take it they are about to do something cruel. And if they add, 'We must be realistic,' they mean they are going to make money out of it.”
― Brigid Brophy
User avatar
Arjen
Posts: 4205
Joined: Sun May 17, 2009 7:12 pm
Location: vught, the netherlands
Contact:

Post by Arjen »

beautiful flowers, I especially like the l. incaica!
however.. I think your e. subdenudata isn't subdenudata, both plant body and flowers are off.
With apologies to the late Professor C. D. Darlington the following misquotation springs to
mind ‘cactus taxonomy is the pursuit of the impossible by the incompetent’ - Fearn & Pearcy, Rebutia (1981)
Post Reply