Systemic insecticides: spray or pour?

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ohugal
Posts: 227
Joined: Sun Aug 18, 2019 10:45 am

Systemic insecticides: spray or pour?

Post by ohugal »

I have access to a few systemic insectides where I am at (Belgium, Europe) such as:
Sanium concentrate (Protect Garden) - 25 g/l flupiradifurone - up to 8 weeks of protection
Multisect (KB) - 5g/l acetamiprid - up to 3/4 weeks of protection
Perfekthion (BASF) - 400 g/l Dimethoat

All of these insecticides prescribe a foliar application and there are no instructions for a soil drench. Only on the website of Uhlig Kakteen do they make mention of a soil drench for KB Multisect: 60ml of Multisect per liter of water instead of 10ml per liter of water for a foliar application.

Is there a reason they only prescribe a foliar application? From a consumer point of view, pouring potted plants can happen in a more controlled (and safer) way. The reason I'm also asking is, can I repurpose the above insectides for soil drenches?

I'm not a big fan of systemic insecticides, but don't always have the time or the means to apply 'alternative' measures. I've never had a major outbreak of any kind, due to good plant hygiene. Over the years I've also learned good cultivation practices (thanks to the forum!) and feel my plants are healthier and happier than when I first started.

Any feedback is welcome and I suppose contacting the aforementioned companies would also help.
Location
Antwerp, Belgium
temperate, maritime climate with mild winters and cool summers
south-west facing window in a city appartment
min. winter temp. 16°C/60.8°F
no outdoor or winter rest capability
keith
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Joined: Wed Jun 12, 2013 3:50 am
Location: S. CA USA

Re: Systemic insecticides: spray or pour?

Post by keith »

3 different kinds of pesticides. acetamiprid is like Imidacloprid which I've used as a soil soak and also watered in from above. I would spray this one but not a fine spray letting the pesticide mix sink into the ground and use a tray to catch the runoff . Soil soak takes a long time use the runoff in the tray to bottom water some of the plants . Doesnt kill spider mites. Do it in cloudy weather or in the evening.

Dimethoat I think is Dimethoate a synthetic organic thiophosphate compound and organophosphate acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that is used as a pesticide. Plant seca uses that one and completely against nicotine insecticides very adamant talked to him yesterday briefly at a cactus show. Killing bees . I've Never used it . If its volatile and smells I wouldn't like it.

Flupyradifurone dont know this one. Sounds interesting.
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ohugal
Posts: 227
Joined: Sun Aug 18, 2019 10:45 am

Re: Systemic insecticides: spray or pour?

Post by ohugal »

Thanks keith for your reply.

Flupiradifurone is a relatively new product on the market here. I've researched it and the compound was patented in 2015. According to the producer is it not a neonicotonoid, but some scientific articles do say it has a lot of similarities. It should be safer for bees than it's predecessors. I wrote to SBM Life Science with my question. This is their reply:
Dear Mr. Hugal,

As you yourself point out, the application of the pesticide requires a much larger quantity of liquid and therefore active ingredient that is not strictly necessary to control the pest. A large part of that solution dries up in the root ball without being absorbed by the plant. And some of it simply washes out without having served any function. This is not in the sense of "using as few crop protection products as possible" and that is why there are applications that dose the active ingredient more precisely and interact more directly with the pest such as the stick and spraying.

The stick is indeed not very suitable for dry mineral substrates and from there we recommend to use the spray anyway.

Kind regards,

SBM Life Science

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
Location
Antwerp, Belgium
temperate, maritime climate with mild winters and cool summers
south-west facing window in a city appartment
min. winter temp. 16°C/60.8°F
no outdoor or winter rest capability
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